How to Vacuum Seal Root Vegetables and Starchy Fruits

(Cómo Sellar al Vacío Las Viandas)

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Learn how to vacuum seal fresh tropical produce to enjoy throughout the year!  Breadfruit is most abundant from July through October in Puerto Rico.   Since I no longer live in Puerto Rico, the breadfruits are only available during the summer months at the Latin Markets in the Midwest.  Therefore, I purchase as many breadfruits as I can in the summer and vacuum seal them after they have been peeled and cut into wedges.   Yams are more readily available at the Latin Markets during the year.

You can also vacuum seal other starchy fruits and root vegetables.  I just selected the breadfruit and yam for the vacuum seal demonstration for this food blog post.

When you vacuum seal your produce, it prevents air from reaching the food due to the secure air-tight wrapping.  Subsequently, the food will last longer and prevent the food from getting freezer burn while being stored in the freezer.  I have two upright freezers full of Puerto Rican produce, semi-cooked foods and cooked foods all packaged in air-tight bags.  During the winter months, I enjoy preparing Puerto Rican cuisine with fresh produce that were either purchased at the store or harvested from my garden.

Let’s Discuss What is a Breadfruit and Yam!

The official Spanish term for Breadfruit is PanapénHowever, we tend to use the shorter versionPanaswhen referring to the breadfruit.  The breadfruit is usually oval in shape and 6 to 8 inches long.  The skin color is light green with an irregular polygon pattern.  However, when the fruit ripens, it will have some red brown areas.  The flesh is white and starchy.   The breadfruit originated in the South Pacific and is cultivated in the Caribbean, South America, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands.

The Yam was brought to Puerto Rico from West Africa.  The yam is large and oblong.  It has a thin dark brown skin and starchy white or yellow flesh.  However, they can vary in size, shape and color.  It is served like a potato when cooked.

We are Ready to Vacuum Seal the Breadfruit!

Once you have peeled and cut the breadfruit into 8 equal wedges (a breadfruit yields 8 wedges), you are ready to vacuum seal the breadfruit.

Click on the link to learn How to Peel and Cut a Breadfruit.

Place four (4) breadfruit wedges into a vacuum seal bag.  

Turn FoodSaver on and insert open end of bag into the slot (vacuum channel) of FoodSaver.   The machine will vacuum, seal and shut off automatically once it senses that the bag is completely sealed.  Continue this process for the other four (4) breadfruit wedges.

Please read your manual on how to operate your FoodSaver in its entirety.

Date and Label each vacuum seal bag and place in the freezer for future use.

We are Ready to Vacuum Seal the Yam!

Cut the Yam into 2-inch slices with a knife.

Insert a knife between flesh and skin and peel the Yam.

Insert two (2) slices of yam into a vacuum seal bag.  You are now ready to vacuum seal the root vegetable.

Turn FoodSaver on and insert open end of bag into the slot (vacuum channel) of FoodSaver.   The machine will vacuum, seal and shut off automatically once it senses that the bag is completely sealed.  Continue this process for the remaining root vegetable (yam) slices.

Please read your manual on how to operate your FoodSaver in its entirety.

Date and Label each vacuum seal bag and store in the freezer for future use.

Click on the button below to watch my YouTube video on How to Vacuum Seal Root Vegetables and Starchy Fruits!

 

Category: Food Preparation Techniques, Recipes

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